Mia Feasey: The Designer Behind the Facebook and Twitter Offices in Singapore

The CEO of Siren Design opens up about redefining the work space.

Since securing her first job as a librarian with a large Australian interior design firm at the age of 21, Mia Feasey has not only scaled the heights but smashed through the ceiling of her hotly contested industry. Today she’s CEO of Siren Design, a collective of dynamic and boldly creative interior designers with offices in Australia and Singapore, and an entourage of blue-chip clients.

From gymnasiums to lecture theatres, testing rooms and luxury homes, Siren is the go-to agency for interiors that are fresh and surprising. “Sometimes our clients have good budgets, sometimes they don’t,” says Feasey. “But we pride ourselves on creating bespoke spaces for every one of them.”

How important is trusting your instincts in design?
Incredibly important. It’s where I began. At the start of my career I didn’t have any technical knowledge so instinct is what drove me. A lot of that had to do with the way I was brought up and encouraged to be creative, to use my instinct. With the generation before mine, it was more about academia.

The Facebook office in Singapore

The Facebook office in Singapore

How do you implement green practices in your designs?
There are basic sustainable practices we employ when choosing recyclable and environmentally friendly building materials that don’t impact on our clients’ budgets or the functional or aesthetic design. But there are some common sense decisions in designing a healthy environment. Like using greenery and natural light, providing ventilation and fresh air, and making sure light switches have sensors that turn them off when a space is not used.

The White Agency in Australia

The White Agency in Australia

Walk us through your design of Twitter’s new office in Singapore.
At the reception you’re greeted by a decorative screen made from 200 traditional concrete breezeway blocks handmade by local craftsmen. The Commons, Microkitchen and Casual Meet areas feature traditional Peranakan concrete floor tiles with splashbacks in a glazed ceramic tile with a floral motif.

The window-walls wrap around the meeting rooms throughout the office and offer subtle hints of the shophouse window facades seen throughout Singapore. They provide a form of decorative screening without blocking out the natural light, and offers a framework for hanging pocket planters to add greenery.

The Twitter office in Singapore

The Twitter office in Singapore

What kind of space do you still dream about designing?
I’d like a hotelier to ask me to design the next-generation hotel and just let me go mental! I’d create different spaces for different kinds of people, because we’re all different, aren’t we? Why should every hotel room have a bed, curtains and bedside table? There should be more choices.

Uniformity is important for hotel groups, but I think the larger chains can still do with much more of a boutique feel. And software. Lots of software. Augmented reality technology is at our fingertips. Guests could use it to alter aromas, flavours and sounds – sensory experiences that are often overlooked by most hotels.

The stairs leading up to Flow Athletic in Australia

The stairs leading up to Flow Athletic in Australia

0 464